Featured Posts

Tell Your Story By Telling Stories I really enjoyed this section of the 5 steps for social media successes by Jeff Bullas about telling your story by telling stories: Stories resonate and help us relate to others. We remember vivid details...

Read more

Are you giving reporters what they want? Ragan Comunications had an interesting post highlighting a recent survey providing some numbers to back up the feeling that reporters want more than just a press release when being pitched a story by your...

Read more

Using Images in Email Marketing Images have the power to tell a story that words cannot begin to convey. ClickZ has begun a series examining consumer email behavior and in this installment, they look at utilizing images in your email...

Read more

Becoming Trusted and Credible Through Blogging In 2005, I helped found BlueJersey.com, a progressive political blog covering New Jersey politics. Frankly, my family supported me but didn't really understand what I was doing or why I was blogging.  They...

Read more

Taking Social Media From Talk To Action The Harvard Business Review is out with a report called "The New Conversation: Taking Social Media From Talk To Action" that is worth a read talking about the growth of social media usage among companies: The...

Read more

twitter

Follow on Tweets

  •  

Becoming Trusted and Credible Through Blogging

Category : Facebook, Social Media, Twitter, blogs

In 2005, I helped found BlueJersey.com, a progressive political blog covering New Jersey politics. Frankly, my family supported me but didn’t really understand what I was doing or why I was blogging.  They thought I was giving away my writing and ideas for free. I always explained how I believed it would demonstrate my knowledge, help legitimize me and ultimately be beneficial. With the rise of Twitter and Facebook, I began to help publicize my writing to larger audiences and still my family questioned. They didn’t doubt me, but still couldn’t see the method to my madness.

Slowly, they began to see the light as I began speaking about social media, appearing in and on traditional media because of my work with new media, was hired for jobs because of my new media knowledge and then was named by the Washington Post’s Chris Cilizza as one of the best NJ political tweeters. I had been a paid political operative for years, however it was writing for free by blogging that truly raised my profile to the point where I became the communications director for the New Jersey Democratic State Committee.

Along the same lines of my story, Jeff Bullas looked at how blogging can make you credible and offered this assessment:

Blogging doesn’t make you an expert but just through the sheer committment, research involved and the passion required to write often and regularly, that the expert label perceived or real starts to  shine through. It is said that to become an expert it takes 10,00o hours of practice to be at the top of your game, whether you be a musician or surgeon.   Blogging gets you noticed  and positions you as a thought leader and consequently as potential customers read your blog posts and observe your committment and passion they brand you as an expert. The next logical step is that they trust you and want to buy from you.

I only wish I could have explained it that well when my family questioned. Blogging got me noticed and because I earned people’s trust, I was considered credible. Trust is essential to communicating because lack of trust leads to immediate questions of credibility and accuracy. I utilized my blogging to gain this trust and credibility, making contacts with traditional media to improve the work I was able to do. I never claimed to be a reporter, in fact constantly credited reporters and talked about how I wouldn’t be able to blog well without them. But I did manage to make myself a credible source of information about news and politics in New Jersey by simply composing my thoughts in the form of blog posts and then distributing them on social media platforms. Anybody can do it, you just have to take the time and make the investment.

52 Facts about social media including 77% of internet users read blogs and a new member joins Linkedin every second

Category : Facebook, LinkedIn, Social Media, Twitter, Uncategorized, Video, Youtube, blogs

We repeatedly make the point here at Medium messaging about the potential reach of the internet and social media. Danny brown shares with us 52 facts about Social Media to help reinforce the point:

So, here are ten facts about the five most well-known social media outlets – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and blogging – with two more bonus facts thrown in just for fun. (And to get to the figure of a fact a week for a year).

Some of the statistics are eye opening. If you’re not blogging, you are missing out on and opportunity to be seen by 3/4 of the audience on the internet:

77% of Internet users read blogs.

We’ve talked about the audience of you tube and while 2 billion viewers per day is nothing to overlook, check out this comparison for some context:

YouTube uses the same amount of bandwidth as the entire Internet used in 2000.

Linkedin’s audience continues to grow as now there are 70 million users worldwide and they receive 12 million unique visitors per day:

A new member joins LinkedIn every second

While much of the attention focuses on the growth of twitter in terms of numbers, which is certainly impressive, the amount of people using twitter as a search tool holds even more potential:

There are more than 600 million searches on Twitter every day.

These numbers will only continue to grow as social media saturates society itself. If you’re not getting in on it yet, you will be eventually.  Years ago, you made sure that your business or personal brand was listed in the Yellow pages, because that’s where people went for their information when they needed help. In coming years, it will be what’s your blog, website and social media accounts.

Twitter as a micro-journalism platform

Category : Social Media, Twitter, blogs, internet, journalism, traditional media

I was reading a really interesting story titled over at arkarthik.com titled, How Twitter is turning Journalism on its head:

Thanks to it’s remarkably easy way of posting tweets (you don’t even need to be at your computer, mobile/cell phone is enough), open conversation model, brilliant in-built search engine and to the new “Trending Topics” algorithm which finds topics that are right away popular, rather than outdated (at times, even some nonsense)  topics, to help people discover the “most breaking” news stories from across the world. Apparently, journalists “follow” Twitter too and it assists them to see new published information very quickly and to publish them even more quickly: to a certain extent, it favors their reactivity in front of events.

Check out this graph comparing the reach of journalism before and after Twitter:

Before Twitter

After Twitter

Here is the conclusion they reach:

Twitter can”t be titled “Social Network” anymore, it’s more of a “Social Media/Social Web” that connecting 100+ million users worldwide. As more ace news organizations (CNN, BBC, Reuters.. to name a few) began to utilize Twitter to its entirety, I am sure – it won’t be a “Micro-blogging platform” anymore. It will be a pioneer of the future “Micro-journalism platform.”

By the way, I am not stating that the traditional news media/journalism became obsolete. It is there and always will be. Good thing is that, most News organizations are realized the power of “Twitter” reach and adopting it as a nice distribution/circulation tool in this fast paced World. That’s all!

Over in the UK, the Guardian has already started to try and change the traditional thinking with their “Open Platform” initiative. Rather than putting their news behind a pay wall, they are capitalizing on the tools for expanded distribution and reach of their content:

The paper has just introduced a free story syndication tool.

The tool is part of the paper’s “Open Platform” initiative, and what it does is pretty amazing: If you’re a publisher of a blog that uses WordPress, you can now re-post Guardian articles directly on your blog. The Guardian is essentially giving away its online news content. For free!

There are some conditions, of course: You have to publish the article in full. You also mustn’t remove or alter any “text, links or images,” so that you preserve the original article with all of its Guardian-sourced editorial goodness. You have to register to get an access code to let you re-publish content, but there’s no fee involved. The articles come with performance tracking code built-in, which you also mustn’t tamper with, but for the privilege of reproducing the content for free this isn’t too much of a price.

This is a brilliant idea as their content can reach a much larger audience with no extra resources expended on their end. They let technology and their readers take the wheel. Hopefully the news media continues to embrace twitter and other forms of new media, but they truly need to engage. While they’re focusing on expanding their audience and readership, those additional readers can help enhance the coverage they provide. New media can provide extra eyes and a direct method to communicate the information to the traditional media, at a time that their resources are already stretched thin and cuts have been made.

75% of internet users spent 22% of their online time on Social Networks

Category : Social Media, blogs, internet

If you’re not using social media, you are missing out on an enormous portion of internet users:

The number of Internet users who visited a social network or a blog increased by 24 percent from April 2009 to April 2010, while the average person spent 66 percent more time on those sites during that period, according to new numbers from the Nielsen Co. research firm.About 75 percent of all Internet users visited a social network or blog in April 2010, and they spent 22 percent of their online time – more than 110 billion minutes – on those sites, Nielsen said.

Not only is it an audience, but it’s a savvy captive one. Again, if you’re not capitalizing on the opportunity, what are you waiting for?

Traffic increases by 50% to blogs with Facebook “like”

Category : Facebook, Social Media, blogs

Here’s another measurable that shows how important integration between your social media efforts is:

TypePad users who installed the Facebook “Like” widgets on their blog sidebars have experienced a 50% increase in referral traffic from Facebook collectively, TypePad revealed in a blog post.Facebook unveiled the “Like” feature at its F8 Developer Conference in late April. Readers can click the “Like” button on an article to share it with their Facebook friends without leaving a publisher’s website.

Here is a good visual for the increase:

If writing a blog is similar to having a conversation with your readers, publicizing your content on social media would be like speaking into a megaphone. A much larger audience is able to hear what you are saying and isn’t that the point of you talking in the first place?