Featured Posts

Tell Your Story By Telling Stories I really enjoyed this section of the 5 steps for social media successes by Jeff Bullas about telling your story by telling stories: Stories resonate and help us relate to others. We remember vivid details...

Read more

Are you giving reporters what they want? Ragan Comunications had an interesting post highlighting a recent survey providing some numbers to back up the feeling that reporters want more than just a press release when being pitched a story by your...

Read more

Using Images in Email Marketing Images have the power to tell a story that words cannot begin to convey. ClickZ has begun a series examining consumer email behavior and in this installment, they look at utilizing images in your email...

Read more

Becoming Trusted and Credible Through Blogging In 2005, I helped found BlueJersey.com, a progressive political blog covering New Jersey politics. Frankly, my family supported me but didn't really understand what I was doing or why I was blogging.  They...

Read more

Taking Social Media From Talk To Action The Harvard Business Review is out with a report called "The New Conversation: Taking Social Media From Talk To Action" that is worth a read talking about the growth of social media usage among companies: The...

Read more

twitter

Follow on Tweets

  •  

Tell Your Story By Telling Stories

Category : Social Media

I really enjoyed this section of the 5 steps for social media successes by Jeff Bullas about telling your story by telling stories:

Stories resonate and help us relate to others. We remember vivid details of stories told when we were kids. The most influential speakers tell memorable stories that stir multiple emotions. The most successful advertising campaigns use storytelling to make a lasting impact. The best media coverage is created by compelling stories.

When crafting your Social Media Messaging, you might find that a story you think is no big deal will be enjoyed by your audience. Build your company’s brand by telling multiple stories that become your key message points, convey your real story and create the image you deserve. Tell your company’s story in a way that focuses on your key target audiences. Make it about them and their wants and needs. Instead of neglecting your Social Media Messaging with copy that might be ignored, tell interesting, real life stories that people will want to read and hear. Then, Social Media can be your conduit to tell your story.

They give plenty of good advice, but you should ask yourself whether you are telling stories. The point is, content is still king and the way you tell your story will help determine the success or failure of any social media marketing plans.

Are you giving reporters what they want?

Category : Social Media, Video, Youtube, advertising, business, journalism, traditional media

Ragan Comunications had an interesting post highlighting a recent survey providing some numbers to back up the feeling that reporters want more than just a press release when being pitched a story by your business, organization or campaign:

An infographic from the PRESSfeed 2012 Online Newsroom Survey highlights some large discrepancies between what journalists want from press releases and what PR pros think they want.

For example, 75 percent of journalists say they want access to video in a press release, but only 43 percent of PR pros think videos are important to journalists. Even fewer (32 percent) have a video gallery in their newsroom.

Also, adding images, graphics and video to a press release can increase views by as much as 77 percent, but more than half (54 percent) of PR pros don’t have the resources to produce them.

Those are some pretty staggering statistics, but that last note is even more interesting. PR pros will need to adjust to the changing times and provide reporters what they are looking for in order to get the cover they way. From the chart below, it looks like they have alot of work to do in order to understand what today’s journalists are looking for.

Becoming Trusted and Credible Through Blogging

Category : Facebook, Social Media, Twitter, blogs

In 2005, I helped found BlueJersey.com, a progressive political blog covering New Jersey politics. Frankly, my family supported me but didn’t really understand what I was doing or why I was blogging.  They thought I was giving away my writing and ideas for free. I always explained how I believed it would demonstrate my knowledge, help legitimize me and ultimately be beneficial. With the rise of Twitter and Facebook, I began to help publicize my writing to larger audiences and still my family questioned. They didn’t doubt me, but still couldn’t see the method to my madness.

Slowly, they began to see the light as I began speaking about social media, appearing in and on traditional media because of my work with new media, was hired for jobs because of my new media knowledge and then was named by the Washington Post’s Chris Cilizza as one of the best NJ political tweeters. I had been a paid political operative for years, however it was writing for free by blogging that truly raised my profile to the point where I became the communications director for the New Jersey Democratic State Committee.

Along the same lines of my story, Jeff Bullas looked at how blogging can make you credible and offered this assessment:

Blogging doesn’t make you an expert but just through the sheer committment, research involved and the passion required to write often and regularly, that the expert label perceived or real starts to  shine through. It is said that to become an expert it takes 10,00o hours of practice to be at the top of your game, whether you be a musician or surgeon.   Blogging gets you noticed  and positions you as a thought leader and consequently as potential customers read your blog posts and observe your committment and passion they brand you as an expert. The next logical step is that they trust you and want to buy from you.

I only wish I could have explained it that well when my family questioned. Blogging got me noticed and because I earned people’s trust, I was considered credible. Trust is essential to communicating because lack of trust leads to immediate questions of credibility and accuracy. I utilized my blogging to gain this trust and credibility, making contacts with traditional media to improve the work I was able to do. I never claimed to be a reporter, in fact constantly credited reporters and talked about how I wouldn’t be able to blog well without them. But I did manage to make myself a credible source of information about news and politics in New Jersey by simply composing my thoughts in the form of blog posts and then distributing them on social media platforms. Anybody can do it, you just have to take the time and make the investment.

Taking Social Media From Talk To Action

Category : Facebook, Social Media, Twitter, advertising, business, marketing

The Harvard Business Review is out with a report called “The New Conversation: Taking Social Media From Talk To Action” that is worth a read talking about the growth of social media usage among companies:

The exponential growth of social media, from blogs, Facebook and Twitter to LinkedIn and YouTube, offers organizations the chance to join a conversation with millions of customers around the globe every day.
This promise is why nearly two-thirds of the 2,100 companies who participated in a recent survey by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services said they are either currently using social media channels or have social media plans in the works. But many still say social media is an experiment, as they try to understand how to best use the different channels, gauge their effectiveness, and integrate social media into their strategy.
But when they say experimenting, it really sounds like feeling around blindly hoping to find something according to some of the results:
  • Three-quarters (75%) of the companies in the survey said they did not  know where their most valuable customers were talking about them.
  • Nearly one-third (31%) do not measure effectiveness of social media.
  • Less than one-quarter (23%) are using social media analytic tools.
  • A fraction (7%) of participating companies are able to integrate social media into their marketing activities.

These should all be huge red flags in any experiment as they represent numerous missed opportunities to capitalize on their efforts in the future.  Follow me below the fold for more. Contunue Reading

36% of top 25 business schools don’t have a single social media class

Category : Social Media, college, education

An interesting story in Forbes takes a look at the top 25 business schools and how they are embracing, or failing to embrace social media in their course offerings:

According to ComScore, social media now reaches over 82% of the worlds online population.  Nearly 1 out of every  5 minutes spent online is used to engage on Facebook, tweet on Twitter, connect on LinkedIn – along with other social media activities. Approximately 33% of US mobile users access social media on mobile devices. And a century of video is uploaded to YouTube every 10 days.

Yet 36% of the top 25 business schools do not have a single social media or social business focused class. And most of the rest have only cursory coverage.

Only one of those schools even had social media as a required course, the rest have it as an elective in their marketing programs. You can see a good INFOGRAPHIC on which schools are buying in:

Social Habit 2011 shows 52% have more than 1 Social Media Profile

Category : Facebook, LinkedIn, Social Media, Twitter, Youtube, mobile

Edison Research released their 2011 Social Habit study, looking at the usage of Facebook, Twitter, mobil social usage and location based services. Here are some highlights:

Social Media now reaches the majority of Americans 12+, with 52% having a profile on one or more social networks.

This figure is driven largely by Facebook, which is now used by over half (51%) of Americans 12+.

Twitter is as familiar to Americans as Facebook (with 92% and 93% familiarity, respectively); however, Twitter usage stands at 8% of Americans 12+.

Approximately 46 million Americans 12+ now check their social media sites and services several times every day.

Much of this frequent usage is driven by mobile access. 56% of frequent social network users own smartphones, and 64% of frequent social networkers have used a mobile phone to update their status on one or more social networks.

Location-based sites and services (such as Foursquare and Facebook Places) are familiar to 30% of Americans 12+, and used by 4% of Americans 12+.

One in four social network users knowingly follow brands, products or services on social networks. For those who use these sites and services several times per day, this figure increases to 43%.

You can see the full study below, but it’s clear there is an audience using social media that your business or organization should be communicating with.

View more presentations from webby2001

What will the NHL/NBC Sports Social Media Integration Experiment reveal?

Category : Facebook, Social Media, Twitter, traditional media

The NHL and NBC Sports have announced that they are going to try and further engage their viewers by integrating social media into the TV broadcast of their 2011 Winter Classic hockey game between the Penguins and the Capitals. We get the news from MediaPost.com:

“We’re running the social and broadcast integration to test the effectiveness and examine the data,” DiLorenzo says. “It should grow our Facebook Fan base, because people must ‘like’ the page to play. It also will build a window into the event for those who may not be in front of the television.”

I’ll be interested to see whether they release any analysis of what the data shows and how effective the campaign really is:

“Aside from looking at how people interact in social communities, this campaign will determine how to leverage fans to influence connections from offline to television to Facebook or Twitter,” says Eric Vieira, associate director at Rocket XL.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so if this endeavor is successful, we should all get ready for efforts like this in other sports and shows. It seems like a logical next step in integration, but making sure businesses are able to see the benefit to the bottom line will certainly determine the true impact of this latest experiment.